Written Three Minute Theses (W3MTs). Expose Research.

Graduate students explain their research in accessible articles that can be read in 3 minutes or less. 

Interested in publishing a W3MT? Learn more.

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Supercritical Fluid Extraction: Recovering the Unrecoverable

Heidi Cossey, University of Alberta. Oil is a precious, but dangerous resource, where large amounts are left behind in waste streams generated by humans in the Alberta oil sands. An innovative engineering technique can recover this resource from waste streams.

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Building for the Future: Construction of Soil for Land Reclamation

Valerie Miller, University of Alberta. As the human population continues to grow, strategies to protect and heal the earth are essential.  Land reclamation strategies can be used to restore healthy ecosystems for future generations.

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A Fuel of the Future

Danish Dar, University of Alberta. Fossil fuels are unsustainable, difficult to process, and hazardous to the environment. A switch to a renewable, cheap, and eco-friendly fuel ( Di-Methyl Ether; DME) may have us all breathing easier, as new research suggests.

 
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food for thought: a Biochemical study of ancient Greek shepherding

Katherine Bishop, University of Alberta. There are limits to what the archeological record can tell us. New research in biochemistry gives us the power to see how animals were managed thousands of years ago.

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Landscape change through before-and-after pictures

Julie Fortin, University of Victoria. Human land use can alter natural biodiversity, and in certain areas, even increase forest cover. Since this can increase wildfire potential and risk, new research aims to study this process through a clever use of old images.

 
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Tiny bacteria can fix a grand problem

Swayamdipta Bhaduri, Ph.D. University of Alberta. One possible solution for global warming is to store greenhouse gasses underground. To do this, bacteria are used to seal the pores in underground chambers and make them air tight.